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5.16.14 We have several upcoming workshops this summer.  Please check out our upcoming events page for more information. http://edprodevelopment.com/upcoming-events/   5.9.14 Week 4 Story Telling is a great way for students to demonstrate their understanding of specific meanings and appropriate uses of terms/vocabulary. Teachers should model the strategy by using 2-3 of the terms and weaving them into a story. Students need to make sure they are using the terms appropriately in their story, not just mentioning them.
  1. Generate a list of terms for students to use to create a story.
  2. Model a sample story or an excerpt that demonstrates how to the terms are used in a narrative.
  3. Encourage students to be creative and choose a topic or genre that is meaningful to them.
  4. Stories can be wacky or serious.
  5. Stories can be any length as long as all words are used correctly.
  Example excerpt from Math Tools, (Silver, Brunsting, and Walsh, 2008):   Math vs. Social Studies Sequence               finite         infinite…. There are a lot of sequences in school. There are sequences of dates to remember in social studies. Sequences in social studies are finite since they start at one time or place and end in another. In mathematics, there can be finite sequences like all the integers between 0 and 10 and infinite sequences like all of the integers greater than 0. When working with sequences…..     Bump is a great way to get a lot of practice in, maybe even from a worksheet or study guide, but without the tedium of the worksheet itself.  
  1. Provide each student a bubble answer sheet (or have them number their paper before beginning).
  2. Place numbered questions around the room on desk tops.
  3. Designate the pattern to follow through the room.
  4. Have all students stand in front of a desk and locate the question number they are looking at on their answer sheet.
  5. Give students a designated amount of time to solve/answer the question and record their answer.
  6. Call out “BUMP” (or other term of your choice) and each student moves to the next desk to answer the question.
  7. Continue until time is up or all students have been to each question.
Option: Students may work in pairs or small groups to come up with answers and record or separate or shared answer sheets. 5.2.14 Week 3 Three Way Tie, is a triangle organizer that connects three separate but related terms (Silver, Brunsting, and Walsh, 2008). It forces students to get right to the heart of the information using a few critical words.
  1. Identify a concept for review.
  2. Connect the concept with two other teams and place on the Three-Way Tie Organizer.
  3. Along each side of the triangle, the student writes a sentence that relates the two connected terms.
  4. Students use the three sentences to develop on summative sentence that is written in the middle of the triangle.
  5. Have students share and explain what they wrote in pairs, small groups or with whole class.
Rotating Review is a cooperative structure in which students move around the room in small groups adding to information left by previous group. 1.  Topics are written on pieces of chart paper and posted around the room. 2.  Each team is given a marker. 3.  Designate teams to go to one of the papers. 4.  Team is given one minute to write on the paper about the specific topic. 5.  Time is called and teams rotate to another piece of paper. 6.  Teams are given one minute to read what was written by the previous team. 7.  Teams put a question mark next to anything they have a question on or disagree. 8.  Team has an additional minute (or 30 seconds) to write any other information. 9.  Repeat steps 4-8 until all teams have rotated to each piece of paper. When every group has been to every question go over all of the answers with the whole class asking for explanations for anything that is not obvious. 4.25.14 Week 2 Fist Lists and Spiders, as Silver, Brunsting, and Walsh (2008) coined them, are visual organizers that help students make connections between ideas, terms etc. and their definitions. These mapping tools are either an outline of a hand or an eight legged spider that students can draw themselves or can be provided for them. The hand allows for 5 concepts related to the word or concept while the spider provides space for 8 concepts.
  1. Identify the concept or term.
  2. Provide students with the organizer or have them draw it.
  3. Have students write the concept or term in the center of the organizer.
  4. Give students think time to generate ideas related to concept or term.
  5. Have students write their best 5 or 8 ideas, depending on which map used.
  6. Have students share, with partner, in small group or with class, their ideas and how they made those connections.
  Inside/Outside Circle is a cooperative learning structure that has the entire class working in pairs that rotate after each question.
  1. The teacher gives each student a note card with a question on the outside and the answer on the inside/back.
  2. Students stand in two concentric circles, inside circle facing out, outside circle facing in.
  3. Students face a partner, and the teacher calls, “inside” or “outside” to let students know who should ask/present their question first.
  4. Students praise or correct each other.
  5. The teacher directs either the inside or the outside circle to turn to the left or right, and then tells them to move “x” number of spaces.
4.18.14 As we approach the season fondly referred to as “TCAP Season” we want to share weekly ideas for test review. Both teachers and students can quickly grow tired of the “same old review sheets”. In an effort to spice things up a bit we are going to share some vocabulary and cocept building tools, as we all know that test taking is greatly dependent on knowing the vocabulary in the directions as well as in the questions and answers. We are also going to share four cooperative learning strategies that can be used with any content. Good luck with test prep and hope the actual assessment results exceed everyone’s expectations. Knowledge Cards Research suggests that to teach vocabulary effectively requires students to (a) form a strong initial connection with the term (Connect), (b) understand how the term relates to one another to fit together to make up a larger structure (Organize), (c)  use thinking strategies and multiple forms of representation to develop a deep, conceptual understanding of the most important vocabulary terms.(Deep Process) and (d) engage in  meaningful review and practice activities that help commit new terms to their long-term memory (Exercise).  (cited from Silver, Strong, &Perini (2005) in Silver, Dewing, and Perini (2012). The Core Six. Essential Strategies for Achieving Excellence with the Common Core.  Alexandria, VA:  ASCD, page 67). Knowledge cards are used to support student learning of new vocabulary by assisting students to “connect” with the term and to “organize” the term.  In addition, construction and use of knowledge cards cuts across several “intelligences” (c.f., Gardner, 1984), such as linguistic, spatial, bodily kinesthetic, intrapersonal, and, if used in partner activities, interpersonal intelligences.  As such, it has wide appeal to a number of students’ learning preferences at some point in the construction and/or use. Each card is to hold one vocabulary word. Students are required to write the formal definition, write a definition in her/his own words, write a sentence containing the word, and create a picture to help remember the meaning of the word.   Cooperative learning is an excellent way to engage all students at one time in a classroom. Using cooperative learning to review for tests is a good way to get a “feel” of your students understanding of the subject matter as you circulate around the room listening to them interact with one another. Below is one of four cooperative learning structures we are sharing to assist with preparation for the TCAP and EoCs. Guess the Fib 1.  Teams must tell three outrageous truths and one fib about subject matter. 2.  Teams discuss and determine each member’s role (who is going to tell the truth and who will tell the fib). 3.  Each team stands and presents their truths and fib to the class. 4.  Class tries to determine who is telling the fib on each team.  

4.11.14

Classroom Management is …

9.  Teach & actively supervise smooth transitions

Research driven approaches to effective classroom management

  1. Establish clear and consistent rules & expectations
  2. TEACH behavioral expectations for rules
  3. Use effective consequences to rule following behavior
  4. Use effective consequences to rule violating behavior
  5. Structure the classroom
  6. Establish effective group management strategies
  7. Establish clear and predictable student & teacher procedures
  8. Teach & actively supervise smooth transitions
  9. Establish a respectful, caring classroom
Safe to Ask Questions & Make Mistakes Only when we feel safe can we comfortable take risks… Dignity Maintained for Teacher & Students It is a 2-way street. And yet, as educators and adults, we must keep our perspective despite the … “challenges”! Kids will not change unless/until we change  

Show Simple Courtesy

Use PEP—Privacy, Eye Contact & Proximity

Appreciation for Diversity
  • Think about what you do to ensure that all students know they are valued…appreciate the differences they bring to the table.
  • Please leave us a comment about what you do.
  All Students are Included and Belong
  • Can you name one or more students who may not feel that they belong/are a part of the class and/or school?
  Respectful, Genuine Interactions & Rapport
  • An effective relationship may be the keystone that allows the other aspects to work well. If a teacher has a good relationship with students, then students accept the teacher’s rules, procedures, and disciplinary actions. Without the foundation of a good relationship, students commonly contest them. (Marzano, 2003)
  The most important part of learning seems to be related to relationships. When students who have been in poverty (and have successfully made it into middle class) are asked how they made the journey, the answer nine times out of ten has to do with a relationship – a teacher, counselor, or coach who made a suggestion or took an interest in them as individuals. (Payne, 1996)
  • Your students who are harder to reach will be the ones with whom you need to employ a systematic process to establish rapport.-Knoster, 2008
  Two primary aspects of rapport are: 1.        The precise steps used to build rapport 2.        The application of these steps in the context of suitable situations and appropriate timing   Steps in Rapport Building
  • Demonstrate
    • close proximity
    • age appropriate touch
    • Appropriate tone of voice
    • Appropriate body language
    • Use of empathy statement
    • Ask open-ended positive questions
    • Listen while the student is speaking (talk less than the student)
    • Ignore nuisance behavior and let the little stuff slide
    • Stay cool throughout the process
  Opportunities for Choice

Definition

“The act of an individual selecting a preferred alternative from among several familiar options.”  (Shevin & Klein, 1984)

Philosophy

  • Empowers students
  •  Enhances quality of life
  •  Maximizes student-directed learning

Requires

  • Opportunities throughout the day.
  • Opportunities to experience natural outcomes.
  • Direct instruction.
 

Next Friday, the topic for discussion will be: test taking strategies

Till next time …

The EdPro Development Team

3.13.14

Classroom Management is …

8.  Teach & actively supervise smooth transitions

Research driven approaches to effective classroom management

  1. Establish clear and consistent rules & expectations
  2. TEACH behavioral expectations for rules
  3. Use effective consequences to rule following behavior
  4. Use effective consequences to rule violating behavior
  5. Structure the classroom
  6. Establish effective group management strategies
  7. Establish clear and predictable student & teacher procedures
  8. Teach & actively supervise smooth transitions
  9. Establish a respectful, caring classroom
 

8.  Teach & actively supervise smooth transitions

 Yes, we must teach these too, no matter what grade/level we teach.

 

Efficient Transitions

  • Teach recognition of transition signal &  steps in transition (ABC)
  • Give “paths” of movements to decrease disruption.
  • Practice in natural contexts.  Teach.
  • Give students time limits to transition quickly.
  • Have races to see how fast groups can move quietly.
  • If centers, have students leave centers with something in writing.
  • Pre-correct in problem situations
  • Monitor continuously
  • Positively reinforce/acknowledge contingently
 

Actively Supervise (SMIR)

 
  • Scan continuously & overtly
  • Move continuously
  • Interact frequently & positively
  • Positively reinforce rule following behaviors

Tight Transitions

Avoids wasted instructional time, disruptions, and conflicts

  • Same way all the time – must be practiced to learn  (at least 2 weeks)
  • Less than 30 seconds
  • Map the route
  • Scaffold the steps – When I say, 1, stand and push in your chairs.  When I say, 2, turn and face the door, ….
  • Point to point movement
 

Next Friday, the topic for discussion will be:

9.  Establish a respectful, caring classroom.

Till next time …

The EdPro Development Team  

3.5.14

Classroom Management is …

7.  Establish clean and predictable student & teacher procedures.

Research driven approaches to effective classroom management

  1. Establish clear and consistent rules & expectations
  2. TEACH behavioral expectations for rules
  3. Use effective consequences to rule following behavior
  4. Use effective consequences to rule violating behavior
  5. Structure the classroom
  6. Establish effective group management strategies
  7. Establish clear and predictable student & teacher procedures
  8. Teach & actively supervise smooth transitions
  9. Establish a respectful, caring classroom

7.  Establish clear and predictable student & teacher procedures

Rules are values that set expectations for student behavior.

Procedures tell students how to perform routine instructional and housekeeping tasks.

 Procedures

  • May be 30, 40, 50 or more
  • Allows for smooth functioning of classroom
  • Builds student autonomy
  • Reduces need for teacher’s constant attention
  • Manages smooth transitions
  • Minimizes downtime
  • Increases predictability for students and teachers

 

Entry Routine …is about making a habit out of what’s efficient, productive, and scholarly after greeting students and as students take their seats and class begins

  • Students pick up packets from table (vs. handing out)
  • Assign seats or allow students to sign up for regular seats
  • Same daily routine for turning in homework
  • Lesson objectives, agenda, and homework assignment already on board in same place
  • Do Now on board or at desk
 

Do Now

  • Written product
  • 3-5 minutes
  • Students complete without direction from teacher or discussion with classmates
  • Previews day’s lesson or reviews recent lesson

SLANT

  • Sit up
  • Listen
  • Ask and answer questions
  • Nod your head
  • Track the speaker
  • Show me SLANT.  Make sure you are SLANTing.
  • Develop nonverbal signs

Procedures

  • Teach as content.
  • Present clearly in an orderly, “step x step” manner.
  • Model for the students.
  • Provide practice time in natural contexts.
  • Review & re-teach as necessary.
  • Reinforce and provide feedback.
  • Apply consequences for correct and “error” responses.

Next Friday, the topic for discussion will be:

8.  Teach and actively supervise smooth transitions.

Till next time …

The EdPro Development Team      

2.14.14 – 

Classroom Management is …

6.  Establish effective group management strategies

 

Research driven approaches to effective classroom management

  1. Establish clear and consistent rules & expectations
  2. TEACH behavioral expectations for rules
  3. Use effective consequences to rule following behavior
  4. Use effective consequences to rule violating behavior
  5. Structure the classroom
  6. Establish effective group management strategies
  7. Establish clear and predictable student & teacher procedures
  8. Teach & actively supervise smooth transitions
  9. Establish a respectful, caring classroom

6.  Establish effective group management strategies

Learning IS Social … or least it should be!

Group Management Issues

  • Managing movement of students
  • Quiet cues/attention getting signals
  • Giving whole class directions
  • Getting help
  • Distributing materials & moving furniture
  • Controlling noise
  • Organizing materials
  • Cooperative Learning Structures

 

 

Movement in the Classroom:

 

Providing Whole Class Directions.

  • Count down
  • Hand up, stop talking and doing. Signal others.  Look.  Listen.
  • Stoplight Cards
  • Quiet Captain
  • When I say ___, you say___.
  • Mechanical Noise Maker
  • Timer
  • Xylophone
  • Other?

 

It’s important that once a teacher gives directions clearly, that students know the rule for not interrupting teacher unless …” (Tomlinson, 2003)

 

Procedures for Getting Help.

  • Assign “Ask Me” students of the day.  (Students wear the “ask me” hats or visors.)
  • Rotate students
  • Establish a “Asking for Help” rule, e.g., if working in team, must ask team members first, then another team before asking teacher.
  • Three before me….

 

Moving Materials and Furniture

  • Pass across groups, not up and back
  • Distribute materials in groups – to the student at the end of each row or to each table.
  • Have table/area captains for collecting and distributing materials
  • Identify a materials distributor and materials collector as a class role.
  • Make sure students have space to keep materials they have yet to complete.
  • Students can be great for re-distributing furniture as long as they are explicitly taught to do so.
  • Use in class personal folders marked with student name, class period/time, and seating area.  Use color codes.

 

Noise Control.

How do I maintain an acceptable level of buzz in the classroom?

  • Provide and use signals for noise reduction.
  • Teach students to monitor noise levels and adjust.

 

What do I do about students who need quiet to work?

  • Ear plugs
  • Head phones
  • Quiet area
  • Other?

Organizing Materials:

  • Portfolios
  • Folders
  • Icon/Color-coded placed for completed work (e.g., bins, organizer trays, …)
  • Color-coded folders for period of day
  • Place for homework, writing folders, …
  • Established location to keep materials (e.g., pouches behind chairs, cans/baskets in the center of table, …)
  • Other???
  • Practice using!

Next Friday, the topic for discussion will be:

7.  Establish clear and predictable student and teacher procedures

Till next time …

The EdPro Development Team  

1.17.14 – 

Classroom Management is …

5.  Structure the classroom

 

Research driven approaches to effective classroom management

  1. Establish clear and consistent rules & expectations
  2. TEACH behavioral expectations for rules
  3. Use effective consequences to rule following behavior
  4. Use effective consequences to rule violating behavior
  5. Structure the classroom
  6. Establish effective group management strategies
  7. Establish clear and predictable student & teacher procedures
  8. Teach & actively supervise smooth transitions
  9. Establish a respectful, caring classroom

5.  Structure the classroom

 

You have control over how your classroom is arranged. Research shows that effective classroom arrangement maximizes student learning by contributing to good classroom management and supporting effective instruction (Evertson, 1993, 1004).
Structure the Classroom
  • Have clear lines of vision to all students.
  • Ensure students can see the black/white board and instructional displays.
  • Position group stations/work stations to minimize distractions  between groups.
  • Seat students with sensory challenges such that you maximize their engagement in instructional activities.
  • Be aware of action zones.
  • Arrange seating based on instructional activities (circular, rows, tables, …)
  • Attend to room temperature, noise level, lighting, color.
  • Provide each student his/her personal space for belongings.
  • Ensure materials are accessible.

 

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Next Friday, the topic for discussion will be:

6.  Establish effective group management strategies

Till next time …

The EdPro Development Team    

1.9.14 – 

Classroom Management is …

4.  Use effective consequences to rule violating behavior

 

Research driven approaches to effective classroom management

  1. Establish clear and consistent rules & expectations
  2. TEACH behavioral expectations for rules
  3. Use effective consequences to rule following behavior
  4. Use effective consequences to rule violating behavior
  5. Structure the classroom
  6. Establish effective group management strategies
  7. Establish clear and predictable student & teacher procedures
  8. Teach & actively supervise smooth transitions
  9. Establish a respectful, caring classroom
 

4.  Use effective consequences to rule violating behavior

I will always be fair, and I won’t always treat everyone the same.

 

Discourage and Correct Rule Violations

  • Attend/reward others for rule following
  • Deliver consequences immediately and contingently upon a rule infraction
  • Treat minor infractions as an error in learning and correct the error.
  • Be calm and use a “matter of fact” tone of voice when giving your consequence. Simply state the rule and consequence.
  • Redirect when early problem “indicators” occur.
  • Pre-correct for problem behavior.
  • Be aware of the “power of proximity”.
  • Avoid “hooks” to power struggles.
  • Keep your sense of perspective and humor.

Least Intrusive form of intervention:

When you do not get 100%, the goal is to limit public attention for undesired behavior and focus on desired behavior. Do not scold or chastise.

  • Nonverbal intervention
  • Positive group correct
  • Anonymous individual correction
  • Private individual correct
  • Lightning-quick public correction
  • Consequence
  • Rely on firm, calm finesse

 Compliance

  • Emphasize compliance you can see
  • Specific – manageable and precisely described actions
  • Concrete – any student knows how to do it
  • Sequential
  • Break it down

 

Lemov, D. (2010). Teach Like a Champion. 49 Techniques that put students on the right path to college. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA.   Do It Again

“Doing it again and doing it right, or better, or perfect is often the best consequence.” (Lemov, 2010, p 194.)

  • Immediately after previously learned procedural violation
  • To reinforce appropriate behavior
  • Group consequence
  • Ends with success
  • “The goal is excellence, even in the little things.” (Lemov, 2010, p.193)

 

Lemov, D. (2010). Teach Like a Champion. 49 Techniques that put students on the right path to college. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA.
  • Discourage and Correct Rule Violations—The Don’ts
  • Don’t embarrass the student in front of peers.
  • Refuse to engage in disciplinary conversation across the room.  Remember PEP.
  • Don’t accept excuses, bargaining or whining
  • Develop an individualized plan for repeated rule violations
Strong Voice

Some teachers have “it”: they enter a room and they are instantly in command.  Below are five techniques anyone can you.  Mastering these skills may not make you the “it” teacher, but having a Strong Voice will surely get you a lot closer.

1.      Economy of language—fewer words are stronger than more

2.      -Do not talk over

3.      Do not engage in off topic conversations

4.      Square up/Stand still when giving directions

5.      Quiet power – drop voice, lower voice, slower speech

  Lemov, D. (2010). Teach Like a Champion. 49 Techniques that put students on the right path to college. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA.  

Next Friday, the topic for discussion will be:

5.  Structure the classroom

Till next time …

The EdPro Development Team      

12.6.13 – 

Classroom Management is …

3.  Use effective consequences to rule following behavior.

 

Research driven approaches to effective classroom management

  1. Establish clear and consistent rules & expectations
  2. TEACH behavioral expectations for rules
  3. Use effective consequences to rule following behavior
  4. Use effective consequences to rule violating behavior
  5. Structure the classroom
  6. Establish effective group management strategies
  7. Establish clear and predictable student & teacher procedures
  8. Teach & actively supervise smooth transitions
  9. Establish a respectful, caring classroom

3.  Use effective consequences to rule following behavior.

I will always be fair, and I won’t always treat everyone the same.

PROPS

“Shouts outs and ups – public praise for students who demonstrate excellence or exemplify virtues.” (Lemov, 2010, p.163)

  • Quick
  • Movement and sound-based (vs. verbal)
  • Universal – expectation for all students to participate
  • Enthusiastic
  • Allow students to develop
  • Examples: 2 snaps, 3 stomps, rocket cheer, high five …
Lemov, D. (2010). Teach Like a Champion. 49 Techniques that put students on the right path to college. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA.

Effective Praise is:

  • Delivered contingently, not randomly
  • Focuses students attention on their own task-relevant behavior
  • Given in recognition of noteworthy EFFOT or success at difficult tasks
  • Uses students own prior accomplishments as the context for describing present accomplishments
  • Convincingly specifies the particulars of the accomplishment being praised
  • Rewards attainment of specified performance criteria
  • Provides information to students about their competence of the value of their accomplishments

Precise Praise

  • 4-5 x as often as criticism and correction
  • Differentiate “acknowledgement” and “praise” Praise exceptional. In the long run, a techer who continually praises what’s expected risks trivializing both the praise and the things she really wishes to label “great”
  • Praise loud, fix soft.
  • Praise must be genuine

Rewards are effective when:

  • Individualized
  • Tiered to specific behaviors
  • Delivered soon after the desired rule following behavior
  • Age appropriate and valued by student
  • Delivered frequently (4-5:1 ratio)
  • Vaired
  • Natural versus Artificial
  • Tiered to students interests and preferences

Positive Framing

  • Live in the now
  • Assume the best
  • Allow plausible anonymity
  • Talk expectations and aspirations – keep their yes on the prize
  • Avoid rhetorical questions
  • Avoid bartering

Next Friday, the topic for discussion will be:

4.  Use effective consequences to rule violating behavior

Till next time …

The EdPro Development Team  

11.26.13 – 

Classroom Management is …

2.  TEACH behavioral expectation for rules

Research driven approaches to effective classroom management

  1. Establish clear and consistent rules & expectations
  2. TEACH behavioral expectations for rules
  3. Use effective consequences to rule following behavior
  4. Use effective consequences to rule violating behavior
  5. Structure the classroom
  6. Establish effective group management strategies
  7. Establish clear and predictable student & teacher procedures
  8. Teach & actively supervise smooth transitions
  9. Establish a respectful, caring classroom

2.  TEACH behavioral expectation for rules.

 

TEACH

Identify and explain rule and its behavioral expectations. 

Rules MUST make sense!

Model/demonstrate relevant examples and non-examples of the rules in context

Arrange structured practice, role play, behavioral rehearsal, including practice in natural environments

Review and periodically update

REMIND         

Pre-correct or prompt rule following behavior immediately prior to entering natural context

Especially non-classroom settings

Post rules with pictures and in other languages, when appropriate.

 

100 Percent

“Excellence is the habit; what you do, you should do well, and the easiest way to do it well is to do it well every time.” (Lemov, 2010, p.170)

  • 100 percent compliance – if you ask, they should all do it.
  • 100 percent follow-though – all the way

Principles of 100 Percent Compliance

“Your goal is to get 100 percent compliance so you can teach. You want the intervention to be fast and invisible.”  (Lemov, 2010, p.171)

1.  Use the least invasive form of intervention:

“Ignoring misbehavior is the most invasive form of intervention because it becomes more likely that the behavior will persist and expand.” (Lemov, 2010, p.175)

  • Nonverbal intervention
  • Positive group correction
  • Anonymous individual correction
  • Private individual correction
  • Lightning-quick public correction
  • Consequence

2.  Rely on Firm, Calm Finesse

Achieving compliance is an exercise in purpose, not power.

3.  Emphasize Compliance You Can See

  • Invent ways to maximize visibility
  • Be seen looking
  • Avoid marginal compliance
Lemov, D. (2010). Teach Like a Champion. 49 Techniques that put students on the right path to college. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA.

Next Friday, the topic for discussion will be:

3.  Use effective consequences to rule following behavior.

Till next time …

The EdPro Development Team    

11.18.13 – 

Classroom Management is …

1.  Establish clear and consistent rules & expectations…Continued

Setting High Academic Expectations:

Consistently, research has shown high expectations are the most reliable driver of high student achievement

No Opt Out:  It’s Not Okay Not To Try

A sequence that begins with a student unable to answer a question should end with the student answering that question. (Lemov, 2010, p.28)

 

Teacher poses a question

  • Student responds incorrectly or indicates “I don’t know”
  • Teacher gets correct answer from another student
  • Teacher comes back to original student, poses the question again, first student gives the right answer, even if it is only to repeat the correct answer

Sequence is complete.  The moment when you circle back and ask the student to reanswer the original question is the No Opt Out.

Lemov, D. (2010). Teach Like a Champion. 49 Techniques that put students on the right path to college. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA.

Right is Right:

Set and defend a high standard of correctness in your classroom. .” (Lemov, 2010, p.35)

As teachers, we are the defenders of right answers.  In our quest to hold out for what is right, there are four categories within Right is Right.

1.  Hold out for all the way.  A right answer includes the negative sign if a negative sign is needed.  There is no such thing as “Right! Except you need a negative sign.”

2.  Answer the question.  If you’re a Right is Right teacher, you know that the “right” answer to any question other than the one you asked is wrong.

3.  Right answer, right time.  Protect the integrity of your lesson by not jumping ahead to engage an exciting “right” answer at the wrong time.

 4.  Use technical vocabulary.   Technical vocabulary expands the students’ vocabularies and build comfort with terms students will need when they compete in college.

Lemov, D. (2010). Teach Like a Champion. 49 Techniques that put students on the right path to college. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA.
Stretch It

 

  • Sequence of learning does not end with right answer
  • Reward right answers with follow-up questions
  • These questions should extend knowledge and/or test for reliability
  • Especially important for differentiating instruction
Lemov, D. (2010). Teach Like a Champion. 49 Techniques that put students on the right path to college. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA.  

Format Matters.

“The complete sentence is the battering ram that knocks down the door to college!” (Lemov, 2010, p.47)

Use Format Matters to prepare your students to succeed by requiring complete sentences and proficient grammar every chance you get.

  • Grammatical format
  •  Complete sentence format
  •  Audible format
  •  Unit format (academic language)
Lemov, D. (2010). Teach Like a Champion. 49 Techniques that put students on the right path to college. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA.

 

Next Friday, the topic for discussion will be:

2.  TEACH behavioral expectations for rules

Till next time …

The EdPro Development Team  

11.8.13 – 

Classroom Management is …

1.  Establish clear and consistent rules & expectations …

  1. TEACH behavioral expectations for rules
  2. Use effective consequences to rule following behavior
  3. Use effective consequences to rule violating behavior
  4. Structure the classroom
  5. Establish effective group management strategies
  6. Establish clear and predictable student & teacher procedures
  7. Teach & actively supervise smooth transitions
  8. Establish a respectful, caring classroom

1.        Establish clear and consistent rules & expectations

Self Assessment—Are your rules & expectations . . .

  • Based upon a sound principle
  • Positive
  • Realistic
  • Understandable -Stated Simply & Behaviorally Written
  • Clear and Specific
  • Enforceable
  • Reviewed and Periodically updated
  • Consistent With School Rules and Personal Philosophy
  • Students involved in creation
  • Posted
Classroom Rules—Expectations Matrix

Be Safe

Be Respectful

Be Responsible

Behavioral Expectations

s Keep hands, feet and objects to ourselves

s Walk instead of run

s Keep feet off furniture and on the floor

s Use materials and equipment as designed.

“T” Charts Be Prepared

              Looks Like                                    Sounds Like

• Books and materials placed in designated areas

• Homework / assignments placed in proper area when completed

• Backpacks hanging on assigned hooks

• Voices at a whisper until the teacher uses the quiet cue

• Hand and feet moving slightly without much noise

• Pencils moving on paper as we work on the assignment

• Pages turning to the assigned page in the book

• Students develop rules for the teacher

• Students develop rules for each other

• Students vote on negotiable rules

• Teacher defines the principles – Students develop the rules

• Generate “I can” statements and why

 

 1.        Establish clear and consistent rules & expectations

Reflect … What, if anything, do you need to do in regard to …

  • Based upon a sound principle
  • Positive
  • Realistic
  • Understandable -Stated Simply & Behaviorally Written
  • Clear and Specific
  • Enforceable
  • Reviewed and Periodically updated
  • Consistent With School Rules and Personal Philosophy
  • Students involved in creation
  • Posted

Look for more information next Friday on:

1.  Establishing clear and consistent rules and expectations”–Continued

Till next time …

The EdPro Development Team   10.25.13 – 
Classroom Management is …   All the things that a teacher does to organize students, space, time, and materials so that instruction in content and student learning can take place.  (Wong & Wong, 1998).   It is essential teachers employ both effective classroom management strategies AND research-validated instructional practices to support all students to achieve at high levels. Without effective classroom management, effects of sound instructional practices are thwarted.  
What are students doing in effectively managed classrooms? s  Following predictable schedules and routines s  Engaging in high rates of academic and on-task behavior s  Engaging in high rates of academic achievement s  Exhibiting high rates of self control and self managing behavior s  Engaging in smooth and efficient transition s  Engaging in high rates of compliance   What are teachers doing in effectively managed classrooms? s  Active supervision s  High rates of positive reinforcement for expected behavior s  Predictable schedules and routines s  Respectful, caring interactions s  Consistent responses to problem behavior s  Use of effective instruction and curriculum  

 Each Friday for the next 11 weeks, the approaches to effective classroom management (below) will be the topics for discussion.  We want this blog to be a collaboration, and as such, please share your insights and experiences, ask questions, and share your resources or just reach out and say hello.  We look forward to a rich, full discussion!

Research driven approaches to effective classroom management

  1. Establish clear and consistent rules & expectations
  2. TEACH behavioral expectations for rules
  3. Use effective consequences to rule following behavior
  4. Use effective consequences to rule violating behavior
  5. Structure the classroom
  6. Establish effective group management strategies
  7. Establish clear and predictable student & teacher procedures
  8. Teach & actively supervise smooth transitions
  9. Establish a respectful, caring classroom

Till next time …

The EdPro Development Team   10.4.13 – EdPro Development, Inc. read the book Teach Like A Champion, 49 Techniques that Put Students on the Path to College by Doug Lemov (2010). Our initial reaction was, “Wow! Can’t wait to share all 49 techniques with our schools!” The book is set up in two parts: (a) “The Essential Techniques” and (b) “Helping Students get the Most out of Reading” and includes a DV with demonstrations of the 49 techniques by teachers. Chapters 1-7 give details on the 49 techniques referenced in the title. The 49 techniques are organized by similarity and include the following descriptors: Setting High Academic Expectations, Planning that Ensures Academic Achievement, Structuring and Delivering You Lessons, Engaging Students in Your Lessons, Creating a Strong Classroom Culture, Setting and Maintaining High Behavioral Expectations, and Building Character and Trust. Mr. Lemov skillfully captured practices by effective teachers focusing on academic achievement as well and the culture of the classroom and the behavior needed for success in a classroom. Chapters 8-9 give 14 additional techniques and are entitled, “Improving your Pacing: Additional Techniques for Creating a Positive Rhythm in the Classroom” and “Challenging Students to Think Critically: Additional Techniques for Questioning and Responding to Students.” In discussing the book, the team at EdPro Development found techniques they had used in the classroom, ideas they had never thought of and strategies they loved and did not love. The culminating statement made by the team at EdPro Development was that every teacher should have access to this book and its techniques and opportunities to implement them. Part Two of the book began with a bang, but for the EdPro Development team fizzled. Chapter 10, “How All Teachers Can (and Must) Be Reading Teachers” underscores the critical need to “teach students to unlock the full meaning of the texts they read” as being, “the single most powerful outcome a teacher can foster.” Chapter 10 is essentially a 12 page discourse to believers on what is most important in teaching, whether working with 7 or 17 years olds. It is the consensus of the EdPro Development team that Mr. Lemov should have stopped at chapter 10, challenging all of us to focus our instruction around reading. We realized this after plowing on through 11 and 12, where Mr. Lemov gave strategies for being an effective reading teacher. We believe the information Mr. Lemov tried covered in those chapters is best left to the likes of Marie Clay, Fountas & Pinnell, Maire Carbo, Patricia Cunningham, Mary Howard, Patterson and the many other experts in reading instruction Kindergarten through Grade 12. In closing, Teach Like A Champion is a must have for any teacher, whether just beginning his/her career or an accomplished veteran. It is in an invaluable tool for the teacher evaluator in that it gives pictures of what one should see and hear when visiting effective classrooms. Instructional coaches will benefit from this resource as well by using the techniques to provide suggestions and ideas in the face of just about any situation one might encounter in the classroom or in reflection. EdPro Development, Inc. highly recommends Teach Like A Champion.  

9.26.13 – We are EdPro Development, Inc.; the only nonprofit corporation in Tennessee formed for the sole purpose of serving schools and school districts through data-driven, quality, ongoing professional development services.

Our mission is to provide the educational community with quality, research-driven and affordable professional development with passion and integrity, that results in each and every student being empowered, equipped, and excited to learn.  Our professional development provides individually tailored supports when and as long as needed.   With over 25 years of experience serving Tennessee, the EdPro Development team has a proven record of offering schools and school districts effective and cost efficient professional development.

What do we want to accomplish and what can you expect?   We hope that through this online community, this blog will become a collaborative resource to expand your tool kit. We hope you join in and share your insights and experiences.

  • The EdPro Development team continually reviews current literature to increase our knowledge of educational strategies. We will share those book reviews with you as well as suggest books and periodicals that we have found to be interesting and useful.
  • We will also bring to you relevant news from the national and local fronts affecting education.
  • We will let you know what we are hearing in classrooms across Tennessee and pass along helpful tips and ideas we gather from our collective experiences working with educators.
  • Other topics open for discussion are Classroom Management, Differentiated Instruction, Collaboration and Co-Teaching and School-wide Positive Behavior Support.
  • We will share with you links to websites and organizations that provide tools to add to your repertoire and hope that you will share your links with us as well.
  • And last, but certainly not least, we will host guest bloggers–authors, speakers, national and state-wide experts.

Together we can achieve more than individually.  We want this blog to be a collaboration, and as such, we want you to always feel free to share your insights, ask questions, and share your resources or just reach out and say hello.

Til next time…

The EdPro Development Team

Dr. Jennifer R. Butterworth, Executive Director Melissa A. Brown, Professional Developer Chasity N. Lowery, Professional Developer


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